Expert Info

Posted by bman0023
on 11 Aug 2020

Hi, I am from the US and looking to move to Norway with my wife and daughter in a few short years. I plan to keep my US citizenship and will be retired. How does one go about with getting residency and what will this entail?  Will we be eligible for healthcare? Will I have to pay double taxes, to the US and in Norway if I am a permanent resident?

Thanks

bman0023 on 12 Aug 2020 - 18:43

We are also considering Sweden and Finland as well.

Claire on 13 Aug 2020 - 08:19

Hello! That sounds exciting, considering Norway, Sweden and Finland! In most cases, non-EU nationals would have to work to be given residence in Norway, however, if you have a look at this page on Visas for Norway it gives a general overview and provides useful links to the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration. Unfortunately, retiring in Norway seems more tricky... it is possible that the other countries you are considering have more flexible immigration allowances and processes for retiring expats. However, it is worth investigating all routes! Have you considered enlisting the services of a relocation company?

Regarding medical care, From what I can tell, all residents in Norway are entitled to access public healthcare. This is not always free but is heavily subsidised. And you can find out more about the processes on this page on Healthcare in Norway. As an expat, you can register with the National Population Register (Folkeregister) and will automatically be assigned a general practitioner (GP). It also seems that the US has double taxation agreements with Norway, meaning you would not have to pay tax on your worldwide income.

As you and your family are considering moving to other countries, have you explored the Expat Arrivals guides to Finland and Sweden yet?

bman0023 on 13 Aug 2020 - 14:05

Ok, thanks.  Some of that is confusing.  I will be working only a few hours a week and this will be my practice in the US, which I plan on keeping remotely and paid in USD.  I am mostly concerned for my child and her future for her to be able to attend the good schools and have the many benefits that the Nordic countries offer, and the safety there too.  The USA is not moving in a direction that I like and I do worry about us staying there and the chaos.  It is a sinking ship and the band is playing on...My wife and I will not really need the healthcare there but that would be nice though to have.  

 

Thanks

Claire on 17 Aug 2020 - 08:25

Expat information on moving abroad can be a lot to take in, especially when you are moving as a family. The countries you are considering (Norway, Sweden and Finland) have a host of excellent schools for you to choose from and a high standard of education. The process of visas, schools, healthcare etc. can be confusing and overwhelming. In your own time, I'd suggest looking through the Expat Arrivals guides: Moving to NorwayMoving to Sweden, and Moving to Finland.

I'd also suggest contacting the nearest embassies for uptodate info and possibly looking into the support of a relocation company. Perhaps someone on this forum with experience of moving to these countries can reach out to you too.

I hope this helps!

Expat Health Insurance

Cigna_logo_300.png

Cigna Global

With 86 million customer relationships in over 200 countries, Cigna Global has unrivalled experience in dealing with varied and unique medical situations and delivering high standards of service wherever you live in the world.

Get a quote from Cigna Global

Cigna_logo_300.png

Moving Internationally?

Sirelo has a network of more than 500 international removal companies that can move your furniture and possessions to your new home. By filling in a form, you’ll get up to 5 quotes from recommended movers. This service is free of charge and will help you select an international moving company that suits your needs and budget.

Get your free no-obligation quotes now!