Expert Info

Posted by Frank Formby
on 29 Dec 2019

This is theoretical as my EU citizenship is pending.  My partner, who has no prospect of EU citizenship, and I are planning to live in The Netherlands.  I gather it shouldn't be too difficult for her to obtain a non-temporary resident visa once I have my EU citizenship.  I've looked but haven't found answers to the following:

  1. We will be returning frequently to Australia to visit friends and family, and for me to work.  How much freedom to do this is there if one wishes to retain residency.  What about journeys within Europe?
  2. What rights does a holder of a non-temporary Netherlands residency visa have in other EU countries.  For example, can we move to Germany or Italy and simply transfer the residency permit? Could my partner also work in Germany or Italy under these circumstances?
  3. How can I find out the implications of transferring my businesses from Australia to The Netherlands?  Which companies give cost-effective advice to expats on questions such as how to avoid double taxation?
  4. Might we, in fact, be better off having an apartment in The Netherlands and not staying for more than 3 months at a time so that we are, in effect, tourists in The Netherlands.  The problem with this, however, is we cannot stay longer than 3 months every 6 months in the entire Schengen area as tourists.  This would make it difficult to settle and make friends in The Netherlands if we are not there much and would restrict our opportunities to travel within the EU

Thanks for your help.

StevenVoortman on 10 Feb 2020 - 09:56

Hi Frank,

for non-EU passport holders, schengen visas are required, and are valid for 180 days and allow entry into any Schengen state (or states) for up to 90 days. To stay longer, a residence permit is required. It is advised to apply for a long-term entry visa prior to travelling to the Netherlands if looking to obtain residency, as this allows entry into the country as a prospective resident rather than a tourist. Residency usually lasts for about a year, but residency is subject to change.If you have an EU visa, you do not need a residence permit, but still need to register your BSN number at the local municipality in the Netherlands. Expats can apply for permanent residence in the Netherlands if they've lived in the country for an uninterrupted period of five years.There are several relocation companies that may be able to assist you further. Perhaps it may be benefficial to speak directly to someone working at a Dutch embassy.

Our guide for expats in the netherlands may be able to answer any other questions you have.

Hope this helps!

Steve

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